GU’s ‘discontinuation’ of Mising, Rabha courses: Blow to ‘inclusive education’

In a major blow to the linguistic minorities in Assam, the Gauhati University, through a notification issued on June 12, 2020, ‘discontinued’ the 6-month-long certificate/diploma courses on Mising and Rabha languages. The decision, taken during the 4th meeting of the Executive council and published as draft proceedings, highlights that the Centre for Languages and CulturalContinue reading “GU’s ‘discontinuation’ of Mising, Rabha courses: Blow to ‘inclusive education’”

Striking a blow against Assam’s inclusive ethos

The State’s language law points to a homogenised nationalism overtaking minority linguistic and cultural aspirations The Assam government recently decided to promulgate a law to make the Assamese language compulsory in all schools, both public and private, including the Kendriya Vidyalayas, from Classes I to X. The State Governor has already given a formal assent toContinue reading “Striking a blow against Assam’s inclusive ethos”

Living with the perennial floods: How Assam’s Mising tribe does it

Much of Assam’s flood management approach is focused on building embankments which are often argued to have facilitated a process of ‘contractor raj’. A fair amount of literature and evidence over the years has highlighted that embankments often do not serve many purposes as they are often breached, either due to higher intensity of floodsContinue reading “Living with the perennial floods: How Assam’s Mising tribe does it”

A crisis of capital: Why migrant workers can’t be ‘managed’ with food and money

The media deprives migrant workers of agency while the Indian state uses them to ‘manage’ the middle class. The Covid-19 pandemic has put the spotlight on migrant workers. Perhaps never before in recent history have they received so much media coverage. The mainstream media, which has often ignored migrants as “invisible” workers, has seemingly turnedContinue reading “A crisis of capital: Why migrant workers can’t be ‘managed’ with food and money”

Racism in times of coronavirus

On Sunday (March 22), around 9.30 pm, a Manipuri research scholar was spat on by a 40-year-old man and called ‘coronavirus’ in Delhi’s Vijaynagar area in North Campus. She, along with a friend, had stepped out of her paying guest accommodation to buy some groceries. In Mysuru, Karnataka, two young students from Nagaland were deniedContinue reading “Racism in times of coronavirus”

India’s Longest Rail-cum-Road Bridge in Assam Is a Death Trap. Here’s Why.

It was January 13. I had an important meeting lined up for the day. I called up my mother in the morning and told her that I would be busy during the day and won’t be taking calls. She informed over the phone that they were preparing for Magh Bihu, which was two days later.Continue reading “India’s Longest Rail-cum-Road Bridge in Assam Is a Death Trap. Here’s Why.”

TALES OF UNWANTED PEOPLE-PERSPECTIVES ON THE RECENT BODO-IMMIGRANTS CLASHES IN ASSAM

That illegal immigration of Bangladeshis to Assam is a serious problem is an indisputable fact. Assam shares a 272-km border with Bangladesh and most of the stretch is still unfenced. The large scale infiltration from the other side of the border is not only threatening to the demographic profile of Assam but also its cultures.Continue reading “TALES OF UNWANTED PEOPLE-PERSPECTIVES ON THE RECENT BODO-IMMIGRANTS CLASHES IN ASSAM”

Peripheral Economy, Global Capital and Movements in Bangladesh: An Interview with Anu Muhammad

(Foreword:- I had taken this interview for Radical Notes to understand the economy and nature of movements in Bangladesh. This post has been republished by various web-journals across the world. I am republishing the same for all the followers of this blog. The interview will provide for insightful ideas on the economy of Bangladesh. TheContinue reading “Peripheral Economy, Global Capital and Movements in Bangladesh: An Interview with Anu Muhammad”

Migration: The Experience of a Mising youth

“Aipemenam, Its dark here and there is no electricity in my room and I am writing to you in the candle light. I miss you a lot but cannot afford to come home and see you as I have to earn lots of money so that I can marry you and we can have aContinue reading “Migration: The Experience of a Mising youth”